From Socrates to Father Zosima: The Importance of Being True to Oneself and avoiding bullshitting (yes, a cognitive term)

For centuries, people have been debating the concept of being a “bullshitter.” Harry Frankfurt’s book “On Bullshit” finally gave a deeper exploration into this idea, defining it as someone who isn’t concerned with truth or falsehood, but simply with impressing or manipulating their audience. This emphasis on outward presentation can have various damaging outcomes. Socrates and Father Zosima, two figures …

The Vampire’s Perspective: The link between Schopenhauer and the sci-fi vampire commander Jukka Sarasti

In Peter Watt’s novel, “Blindsight,” the subspecies known as “vampires” stand in contrast to regular humans. They possess enhanced intelligence, physical abilities, and a hunger to understand the world around them. They are the evolved version of Homo Sapiens, making one question the nature of humanity and our potential for evolution. This portrayal aligns with the philosophy of Arthur Schopenhauer, …

The Brothers Karamazov and existential philosophy

The Brothers Karamazov is a philosophical masterpiece that invites readers to consider some of the most fundamental questions of the human experience. Written by Fyodor Dostoevsky, the novel is a nuanced and deeply moving exploration of themes such as the nature of faith, the existence of God, and the search for meaning. At the heart of the novel are the …

Schopenhauer and the knowledge illusion – why we never think alone

Have you ever found yourself feeling like you really understood something, only to realize later that your understanding was limited or incomplete? If so, you’re not alone. This tendency to overestimate our own understanding is known as the “knowledge illusion,” and it’s a topic that’s explored in depth in the book The Knowledge Illusion: Why We Never Think Alone by …